All I care about is everything.
I like to lie down and look up at the stars,
even when there are none.
I am almost nothing but thoughts and water.

I find mirrors unbearably off-putting.
My children find them droll.
Do you feel that too?
My left hand feels like a cataclysmic storm.

I will never tire of looking at my wife.
Her smile is like a constant sonar beep
in the depths of my chest.
I hear rain even when it’s sunny out.

Have you ever squinted at the ocean
so the sky and the water blend until
you don’t know where one ends and the other begins?
I’m doing that right now with you.

This appeared in the May 2015 issue.

Greg Santos
Greg Santos is a poetry editor at Carte Blanche, and the author of Rabbit Punch! and The Emperor’s Sofa.
Ashley Mackenzie
Ashley Mackenzie (ashmackenzie.com) counts the New York Times, Scientific American, and The New Republic among her clients.

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