At The Walrus, we’ve shared essays and features about fathers who are working to give their children better lives and about those indebted to their fathers. We’ve also discussed more complicated relationships—dads who are absent, dads who are missed, and unconventional father figures—all of whom come to mind on Father’s Day.

Here are some of those conversations.



How to Have “the Talk” as a Muslim Father

BY YASIR KHAN
Growing up, I remained largely ignorant about healthy sexuality. Can I do better for my daughter?




My Son Peed Onscreen in a Zoom Call, and Other Tales of a Working Parent

BY MIHIRA LAKSHMAN
In a pandemic, our economy is sending a clear message: you can either work or parent




The Stories We Tell About Our Fathers

BY HARLEY RUSTAD
Bill Gaston’s new memoir examines his dad’s life—and our fears that we all become our parents




Every Stepfather Has His Day

BY KEVIN CHONG
People say your life changes when you become a dad. Mine changed when I met my wife’s son




Learning to Forgive My Distant Father

BY MARK ABLEY
I always knew my dad loved me. But he often seemed to love his music more




Growing Up Mulroney

BY TESSA LLOYD
Their father was prime minister for nearly a decade. What was it like to be his sons?

The Walrus Staff

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Sincerely,
Jessica Johnson
Editor-in-Chief