Bee in Aster

I saw the crisped, curled, and sere beech leaf float from ninety feet above on a serene long voyage across the air and come to the fountain’s sheer falling wall …

I saw the crisped, curled, and sere
beech leaf float from ninety feet above
on a serene long voyage across the air
and come to the fountain’s sheer
falling wall of water, touch, and be
violently thrust down, lost in an instant
in the sheen of the plunge to reappear
on the pool’s surface, shot back
toward the trunk it had hovered free of,
then slowing, in miniature narrows passing between
the ornamental rocks to sleep drifting
by a bee stubborn in a violet aster
and to swirl, copper, with many other leaves,
gold, red, and green, on a clear bed of water
an inch above perfectly fitting stones
laid long ago to be the basis
to my delight by someone I’ll never know.

This appeared in the March 2012 issue.

A.F. Moritz
A. F. Moritz won the 2009 Griffin Poetry Prize for his collection The Sentinel. He has translated Chilean Canadian writer Ludwig Zeller’s The Rules of the Game into English.

Like What You’re Reading?

Fact-based journalism is our passion and your right.

We’re asking readers like you to support The Walrus so we can continue to lead the Canadian conversation. This past year has seen some serious changes in Canada, from the mainstreaming of cannabis to the fallout of the SNC-Lavalin affair to our response to COVID-19.

We feature Canadian voices and expertise on stories that travel beyond our shores, and we firmly believe that this reporting can change the world around us. The Walrus covers it all with originality, depth, and thoughtfulness, bringing diverse perspectives to bear on essential conversations while setting the highest bar for fact-checking and rigour.

None of this would be possible without you.

As a nonprofit, we work hard to keep our costs low and our team lean, but this is a model that requires individual support to pay our contributors fairly and maintain the strength of our independent coverage.
Donations of $20 or more will receive a charitable tax receipt.
Every contribution makes a difference.
Support The Walrus from as little as $2. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *