Deciphering the Big Stories

Some of the most complex developments of 2021 necessitated deep dives and investigative reporting

Text saying "2021 Deep Dives" over a red pattern made of magazines, documents, and writing utensils
Banner illustration by Chanelle Nibbelink

A Deep Dive into 2021

Complex topics require a bit more breathing room and extra space to explore. This year, The Walrus published a number of deep dives: extensive features that investigated everything from immigration to medical mysteries to animal smuggling.

These meticulously reported long reads feature many different voices and, in some cases, travel across international borders. While many of these stories have global ramifications, others unpack how major Canadian institutions—be they a national police force or a provincial government—operate. Each piece is an opportunity to delve into some of the most pressing issues of the year.

These are the big-picture conversations we were having this year.


@nickhunebrown on Twitter
“My feature on international students is online. It’s a wide-ranging look at a massive, under-examined industry, following students from rural India, through the unregulated world of education agents, to the colleges that increasingly depend on their fees.” – @nickhunebrown






@TheWalrus on Twitter
“What happens when you’re one of the few making a call for change? Particularly when you are coming from a community that is not represented, or misrepresented. When you criticize the system you work in there is tension, apprehension, courage. – @Nanaaba










@TheWalrus on Twitter
“What is the correlation between a lack of information, misinformation, and too much information? @BrittanyAmofah of The Broadbent Institute asks us to consider.” – @thewalrus


@TheWalrus on Twitter
“Why don’t we have Covid-19 vaccine production in Canada?
@pcfralick asserts decades of policy decisions have not encouraged the sector to thrive. There has not been an ideal relationship between Big Pharma and the federal government to work toward common objectives.” – @thewalrus

The Walrus Staff

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