The Jailor

Decency is a hopeless weapon. Daily I fall from grace, The big splash, whatever. I should have been a starlet, I should Have had chairs pulled out for me, swirling …

Illustration by Studio Tipi

Decency is a hopeless weapon.
Daily I fall from grace,
The big splash, whatever.

I should have been a starlet, I should
Have had chairs pulled out for me, swirling
Through my twenties in couture:

Marriage is the big lie. Oh sure, love crashed
Into my life, a dark tower of flight
And all its apparatuses, a walking

Muscle with a slick of black hair.
Soon it was legal. A large egg swelling
From the bowl of my hips.

I stared into his heart
And like the Emperor
I was too vain

I said, What a tower, what a prize!
Brute love that, bite by bite,
We indulged, so crazed we bit

Until we tasted the last of it
And stunned ourselves
With our emptiness

I should have gone to Hollywood.
If you’re going to be a trophy
You might as well go for gold.

Stop at nothing, you who are ambitious,
Or, as they say, narcissistic.
Let me tell you this:

There is nothing like a diamond
To cheer, nothing like a cocktail
To numb. Nothing but love to fear.

This appeared in the January/February 2016 issue.

Sina Queyras
Sina Queyras has work forthcoming in Poetry and The Malahat Review.
Studio Tipi
Studio Tipi draws regularly for Monocle and The Weekender.

Join our community

Dear Readers,

For years, experts have raised the alarm about political polarization. It’s been said the left and right can’t talk to each other. Blame the political climate. Blame the rise of tech platforms and social media algorithms. But we don’t talk enough about the difference in the quality of the information that we receive and share.

As more and more media outlets die and as parts of Canada become “news deserts,” there are two types of citizens emerging: those with access to high-quality, fact-based journalism, like the kind you’ll find in The Walrus, and those without it.

One thing all reliable media outlets have in common: it takes time and adequate funding to produce good journalism.

If you like reading The Walrus, we ask that you consider becoming a monthly supporter. Your donation helps us keep The Walrus’s fact-checked online journalism free to all.

Jessica Johnson
Sincerely,
Jessica Johnson
Editor-in-Chief