Growing Up in Cambridge Bay

Portraits and interviews

Portraits and interviews
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Nuka, 13 I want to write a book. A love story. And I want to open a chocolate shop in Belgium.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Jordan, 15 I find that poetry gets my feelings out the best. I also express myself by singing. I pretty much try and find lots of creative ways to get that anger out rather than yelling at somebody.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Dedre, 19 My job at the youth centre is to supervise the kids and make sure they don’t come in here being a drug addict or an alcoholic.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Rolonda, 13 We don’t have to use seat belts here. I like that ’cause selt belts are annoying and they hurt when you hit bumps.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Candice, 16 I got really close to a lot of people when I moved up here. I just don’t have the same connections down south.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Jonathan, 15 (on bed) I honestly think we’re losing the culture.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Colin, 14 I sent my grandpa a photo of when I was leading the cadets, and he said I looked exactly like my great uncle Wendel Clark. He was the sharpest and tallest man in his whole battalion. It’s what my grandpa said about me in my uniform.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Douglas, 15 You see the northern lights once, you’re probably going to want to move here.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Jason, 16 I want to do something in politics. I’d like to start off local at first, then provincial, then federal. That’s my plan.
Photograph by Finn O’Hara
Kristie, 17 (left) Everyone knows everyone, and it makes it complicated. I guess you don’t have that much openness. Everyone’s talking and gossiping. It’s just tiresome.

Finn O’Hara

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