Cast-offs

Poignancy of the discarded. The armless doll that stares from the trash heap in spring, the sagging sofa with the cat-scratched arms, the love-stained mattress in the rain. Inside-out umbrellas, …

Illustration by Alex Westgate

Poignancy of the discarded.
The armless doll that stares
from the trash heap in spring,
the sagging sofa with the cat-scratched arms,
the love-stained mattress in the rain.
Inside-out umbrellas, broken-ribbed,
flapping forlornly in puddles,
and jack-o’-lanterns after Halloween,
askew on compost piles.

Poignancy even of the intact, discarded:
here, today, curbside by the corner post
(among junked chairs and rust-stained mops)
a perfectly good birdcage
with all the fittings: porcelain cups
for seed and water,
ladders, mirrors—all the bells
and whistles—everything
but the bird.

This appeared in the November 2013 issue.

Robyn Sarah
Robyn Sarah will publish a new collection, My Shoes Are Killing Me, in April.

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