Ghazal

for Mimi Khalvati The air thickens, already more than half in summer. At the corner café, girls in T-shirts laugh in summer. The city streets, crowded with possibility under spring …

for Mimi Khalvati

The air thickens, already more than half in summer.
At the corner café, girls in T-shirts laugh in summer.

The city streets, crowded with possibility
under spring rain, thin out, don’t promise enough in summer.

That urge to write one’s life instead of living it
makes sentences slip limply off-the-cuff in summer.

Stacked in a drawer under an expired passport,
curly-head in an orchard smiles for a photograph in summer.

Going downstairs early for bread: two winos snore on the landing,
“Can’t they make do with sleeping in the rough in summer?”

Hard-case on the street, teacher out of class both harbour
a low-grade fever and productive cough in summer.

Espresso winter, springtime of Juliénas:
black tea with honey’s what I’ll quaff in summer.

Despite my wall of books and Bach’s geometries,
some scent wafts from the street to call my bluff in summer.

Not in a tank but a golf cart rides the oligarch:
however, he does not dismiss his staff in summer.

Let them not, in Maryam’s name or Marilyn’s,
blot any cindered city off a graph in summer.

Marilyn Hacker

Like What You’re Reading?

Fact-based journalism is our passion and your right.

We’re asking readers like you to support The Walrus so we can continue to lead the Canadian conversation. This past year has seen some serious changes in Canada, from the mainstreaming of cannabis to the fallout of the SNC-Lavalin affair to our response to COVID-19.

We feature Canadian voices and expertise on stories that travel beyond our shores, and we firmly believe that this reporting can change the world around us. The Walrus covers it all with originality, depth, and thoughtfulness, bringing diverse perspectives to bear on essential conversations while setting the highest bar for fact-checking and rigour.

None of this would be possible without you.

As a nonprofit, we work hard to keep our costs low and our team lean, but this is a model that requires individual support to pay our contributors fairly and maintain the strength of our independent coverage.
Donations of $20 or more will receive a charitable tax receipt.
Every contribution makes a difference.
Support The Walrus from as little as $2. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *