The Walrus Talks at Home: Veteran Identities

Going beyond the headlines to understand veterans’ experiences

green background, abstract shapes, text that reads Veteran Identities November 9

green background, abstract shapes, text that reads Veteran Identities November 9
 

Going beyond the headlines to understand veterans’ experiences

What does it mean to be a veteran now? Nationally and individually, we have preconceived ideas and expectations of what a veteran should be. The actual lived experience of being a veteran is broad and shifting, and personal narratives are essential when considering how Canada’s military culture moves forward.

Through actions such as voting and paying taxes, all Canadians impact the shape of our military. As members of our communities serve to fight against local wildfires or are involved in global conflict, how are we advancing transparency, dignity, and healing in these evolving systems?

The Walrus Talks at Home: Veteran Identities is a rare opportunity to hear directly from veterans as they share powerful insights and consider complex questions on ideas of leadership, belonging, vulnerability, and strength. Join us for this important and timely conversation.


Photos of Michelle Douglas, Maya Eichler, Wendy Jocko, Jessica Lynn Wiebe, Christine Wood
 

Featuring five-minute talks and Q&A with:

  • Michelle Douglas, Executive Director, LGBT Purge Fund
  • Wendy Jocko, Chief of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation
  • Jessica Lynn Wiebe, Interdisciplinary Artist and former Artillery Soldier
  • Christine Wood, Retired RCAF Logistics Officer and Veteran Advocate
  • Moderated by Dr. Maya Eichler, Director, Centre for Social Innovation and Community Engagement in Military Affairs, Mount Saint Vincent University

An event on Zoom
Wednesday, November 9, 2022
7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. ET
 
Free with registration

Accessibility Information
We strive to be accessible and inclusive. If you require support to be able to fully participate in this event, please contact events@thewalrus.ca or (416) 971-5004, ext. 247. Livestream captioning will be available for this event.
Même si cet événement aura lieu en anglais, Retraités fédéraux est heureux de fournir un service d’interprétation simultanée en français. Vous pourrez sélectionner la langue désirée au début de l’événement.

Supported by

National Association of Federal Retirees Logo


2022 National Sponsors

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The Walrus is proud to recognize Labatt Breweries of Canada as our National Sustainability Partner

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Jessica Johnson
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