WATCH: The Walrus Talks at Home: The Next Gen on the Circular Economy

What could Canada’s future economy look like?

Promo image for The Next Gen on the Circular Economy event on Sept 13, 2021 with a play button.


What could Canada’s future economy look like?

Find out where the circular economy is headed as a panel of four young professionals take the virtual stage. Should we be optimistic about Canada’s economic future becoming circular? The next generation of leaders shares how we can make individual and systemic changes today to create a more sustainable tomorrow.

Join us to learn what economic and environmental benefits await us at The Walrus Talks at Home: The Next Gen on the Circular Economy.

WCEF logoThis is a registered side event of the World Circular Economy Forum.


 
Four images of the smiling faces of four event speakers: Ran Goel, Chantal Rossignol, Anna-Kay Russell, and Sophia Yang
 

Featuring five-minute talks and Q&A with:

  • Ran Goel, CEO and Founder, Fresh City
  • Chantal Rossignol, Network of Living Labs in Circular Economy Coordinator, CERIEC
  • Anna-Kay Russell, Manager of Public Affairs, WoodGreen Community Services
  • Sophia Yang, CEO and Founder, Threading Change

Monday, September 13, 2021
7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. ET

Accessibility Information
We strive to be accessible and inclusive. If you require support to be able to fully participate in this event, please contact events@thewalrus.ca or (416) 971-5004, ext. 259. Captioning will be available for this event.

Presented by

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2021 National Sponsors

The Walrus is proud to recognize Air Canada as our Exclusive Airline Partner

The Walrus is proud to recognize Facebook Canada as our Future of the Internet Partner

The Walrus is proud to recognize Labatt Breweries of Canada as our National Sustainability Partner

The Walrus is proud to recognize Shaw as our National Events Sponsor

The Walrus is proud to recognize Indspire as our National Education Sponsor

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