The Longest Winter

One year into a pandemic, how do we rethink our relationship to the cold, dark months?

Animated gif of snow falling behind the words "The Longest Winter" on a violet background.

The Longest Winter

In the warmer months of COVID-19, we found relief in backyard barbecues, park picnics, and socially distanced strolls. This winter, as temperatures stay low and restrictions remain tight, mental health experts are worried about the toll of a locked-down season. But the pandemic provides an opportunity: to reimagine what these long, cold months could be. In a new digital series, updated each week through February, The Walrus is rethinking how we can go from coping with the season to thriving through it.


How Parks Got Us Through a Tough Winter

The pandemic showed just how important green spaces are to our mental health. How can we keep them accessible during the coldest months?

BY TANNARA YELLAND
ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL JOAN WALLIS


Is Fast Fashion Finally out of Style?

With big retailers closing locations and customers flocking to boutique brands, shopping habits may be changing for good

BY LAURA HENSLEY
ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL JOAN WALLIS


Will COVID-19 Change How We Think About Disability?

From prioritizing pedestrian spaces to proliferating online hangouts, the pandemic has made accessibility mainstream. Will it last?

BY AIMEE LOUW
ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL JOAN WALLIS


Having a Miserable Winter? Go For a Walk

Getting your daily steps is the perfect winter activity, now more than ever

BY DAN RUBINSTEIN
ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL JOAN WALLIS


More on Winter


Series Credits

Series Editor Carine Abouseif
Editors Harley Rustad, Tajja Isen, Daniel Viola, Nicole Schmidt
Art Direction Natalie Vineberg
Producers Angela Misri, Sheena Rossiter
Head of Research Erin Sylvester
Copy Editor Jonah Brunet
Fact Checkers Nicole Schmidt, Sydney Hamilton, Lucy Uprichard, Emily Baron Cadloff

The Walrus Staff

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