With the climate crisis top of mind for many Canadians, The Walrus has explored a number of different facets of how humans are impacting the natural world. Some of these stories are smaller in scale—covering a bug that can be found in your backyard—while others soared as high as one of the ancient cedars in BC’s inland rainforest. Our environmental coverage has also touched on other spheres of influence, including education, municipal politics, and the world of business.

Here are some of those conversations.



Arsenic and Gold: My Family’s Role in the Poisonous Legacy of Giant Mine

BY EVA HOLLAND
Could my grandfather have done more to stop the dangerous dust that spewed from the mine for decades?




Sewergate: There’s Something Rotten in the State of Our Waterways

BY NATHAN WHITLOCK
A sewage leak in southern Ontario highlights the toxic relationship between cities and water




Revenge of the Earthworms

BY MOIRA DONOVAN
A gardener’s best friend? Think again. How invasive earthworms are wreaking havoc on our ecosystems




Burning Up: The Controversial Biofuel Threatening BC’s Last Inland Rainforests

BY BRIAN J. BARTH
The wood-pellet industry is booming. Will it push old-growth ecosystems to the brink?




How the UK Is Winning the Race against Climate Change

BY ANNE SHIBATA CASSELMAN
While Canada has fumbled every climate promise, the UK has been hitting its emissions targets. What would it take to catch up?




Why Are Oil-and-Gas Companies Developing Lesson Plans for Teachers?

BY AINSLIE CRUICKSHANK
The fossil fuel industry has long understood the power of the school system in shaping perceptions around climate change



Dr. Shannon Lloyd: Setting Meaningful Climate Targets for Companies

BY THE WALRUS TALKS
The Walrus Talks What’s Next?

The Walrus Staff

New Year, New Stories

Hello and Happy 2023!
As we start this new year, we need you now more than ever. In these uncertain times, it is crucial that reliable media remains available to everyone. That is why we depend on your support to keep our journalism accessible and independent. From the economy to political polarization, the challenges our society is facing this year are too important for half truths. At The Walrus, the future of journalism is funded by engaged citizens like you. Together, we can preserve the integrity of Canadian media and ensure that our democracy thrives. Will you join us?
With thanks,
Jennifer Hollett
Executive Director
Jenn