Day 11 | 10 | 9 | 8 | 7 | 6 | 5 | 4 | 3 | 2 | 1

  In anticipation of the new year, we revisit some of Canada’s biggest conversations of 2017

From Lido Pimienta’s rebellious Polaris win to the death of Tragically Hip front man, icon Gord Downie, these are the arts and culture events that made our country cheer, cry, and come together.

Illustration by Benoit Tardif
 
How Stuart McLean taught me that the world is a good place
  I spent more than ten years producing The Vinyl Cafe—and it was nowhere near enough time with the funniest, most generous man in Canada By Jess Milton
Remembering Cerebus, Canada’s Cantankerous Aardvark
  The comic series, which turns forty this month, is one of the funniest, most innovative, and most offensive ever made By Jason Guriel
What Makes Alias Grace so Good
  As a TV writer, I learned strong protagonists drive action. But the latest adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s feminist classic subverts all of that By Courtney Jane Walker
Gord Downie's Final Act
  The Tragically Hip frontman spent his final days challenging and confronting what it means to be Canadian By Ryan McNutt
What I Learned From Asking Celebrities to Photograph Me at TIFF
  For fifteen years, I’ve asked everyone from Isabella Rossellini to Salman Rushdie to flip the lens. The result is a visual archive of my life—and a meditation on the changing nature of stardom By Jeff Harris
Movie Biopics Are Fake News for the Soul
  Battle of the Sexes bends the facts to give us a message of hope—but that’s exactly what we need right now By Mike Sholars
How One Translator Brought Quebec's Greatest Authors to English Canada
  For Sheila Fischman, translation represents the hope that our country’s fractured identity can be healed by understanding how others see the world By Derek Webster, photography by Terence Byrnes
The Unbearable Whiteness of CanLit
  Black writers are not marginal to our literature; they are our literature. So why aren’t they being taught? By Paul Barrett and Darcy Ballantyne and Camille Isaacs and Kris Singh
Lessons From Calgary's Public Art Scandal
  What the Bowfort Towers can teach us about urban identity-making By Gillian Turnbull
The Case Against Reading Everything
  Writing instructors preach exposure to different voices and styles. They are wrong By Jason Guriel
The Personal Essay Isn't Dead. It's Just No Longer White
  Recent criticism of the form’s faults says more about the genre’s historical whiteness than it does the talent of its new stars By Soraya Roberts
Why Academics Revel in Bad Writing
  The profession’s taste for tortured verbiage comes from a desire to be taken seriously. But does it matter if no one actually reads their work? By Sarah Sweet
From Lido Pimienta’s rebellious Polaris win to the death of Tragically Hip front man, icon Gord Downie, these are the arts and culture events that made our country cheer, cry, and come together

The Walrus Countdown

What Moves Us

From Lido Pimienta’s rebellious Polaris win to the death of Tragically Hip front man, icon Gord Downie, these are the arts and culture events that made our country cheer, cry, and come together

BY


Day 11 | 10 | 9 | 8 | 7 | 6 | 5 | 4 | 3 | 2 | 1

 
In anticipation of the new year, we revisit some of Canada’s biggest conversations of 2017



From Lido Pimienta’s rebellious Polaris win to the death of Tragically Hip front man, icon Gord Downie, these are the arts and culture events that made our country cheer, cry, and come together.

Illustration by Benoit Tardif

 

How Stuart McLean taught me that the world is a good place

 
I spent more than ten years producing The Vinyl Cafe—and it was nowhere near enough time with the funniest, most generous man in Canada
By Jess Milton

Remembering Cerebus, Canada’s Cantankerous Aardvark

 
The comic series, which turns forty this month, is one of the funniest, most innovative, and most offensive ever made
By Jason Guriel

What Makes Alias Grace so Good

 
As a TV writer, I learned strong protagonists drive action. But the latest adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s feminist classic subverts all of that
By Courtney Jane Walker

Gord Downie’s Final Act

 
The Tragically Hip frontman spent his final days challenging and confronting what it means to be Canadian
By Ryan McNutt

What I Learned From Asking Celebrities to Photograph Me at TIFF

 
For fifteen years, I’ve asked everyone from Isabella Rossellini to Salman Rushdie to flip the lens. The result is a visual archive of my life—and a meditation on the changing nature of stardom
By Jeff Harris

Movie Biopics Are Fake News for the Soul

 
Battle of the Sexes bends the facts to give us a message of hope—but that’s exactly what we need right now
By Mike Sholars

How One Translator Brought Quebec’s Greatest Authors to English Canada

 
For Sheila Fischman, translation represents the hope that our country’s fractured identity can be healed by understanding how others see the world
By Derek Webster, photography by Terence Byrnes

The Unbearable Whiteness of CanLit

 
Black writers are not marginal to our literature; they are our literature. So why aren’t they being taught?
By Paul Barrett and Darcy Ballantyne and Camille Isaacs and Kris Singh

Lessons From Calgary’s Public Art Scandal

 
What the Bowfort Towers can teach us about urban identity-making
By Gillian Turnbull

The Case Against Reading Everything

 
Writing instructors preach exposure to different voices and styles. They are wrong
By Jason Guriel

The Personal Essay Isn’t Dead. It’s Just No Longer White

 
Recent criticism of the form’s faults says more about the genre’s historical whiteness than it does the talent of its new stars
By Soraya Roberts

Why Academics Revel in Bad Writing

 
The profession’s taste for tortured verbiage comes from a desire to be taken seriously. But does it matter if no one actually reads their work?
By Sarah Sweet

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